Rapid Fire: Yogi Bear, Community Radio and Superhero Law

posted Dec 21, 2010, 9:54 AM by Calan McConkey
(1) A 25 year-old animator, Edmund Earle, has created a video containing Yogi Bear and Boo Boo using the same style of animation as the major motion picture that was released in theaters this past weekend. Not to ruin the ending, but it deals with subject matter that is adult-oriented. But probably not the kind you are thinking of. At first glance, this looks like copyright infringement by the animator. Warner Brothers, however, has taken an unusual step in response to the video. Warner Brothers announced that the video is likely protected as a "parody" under the doctrine of fair use and has not made a demand to YouTube for its removal (nearly 3 million views so far). This seems like a strategic move on the part of Warner Brothers in order to increase visibility of its recently-released movie. If Warner Brothers really wanted to go after the artist then I'm sure they would win, based solely on the amount of money and legal documents they could throw at Mr. Earle.

YouTube Video
Source: BlawgIT



(2) Last week, Congress passed the "Landmark Community Radio Act." This legislation effectively opens up the radio spectrum to potentially thousands of local independent radio stations. According to the press release by the Future of Music Coalition, the upshot of this legislation is that:

"The addition of more Low Power FM (LPFM) stations will increase local civic engagement, diversify the airwaves, support local music and culture, assist during emergencies, expand religious expression, and provide a platform for the voices of underrepresented communities to be heard."

Sources: (1) Pitchfork, (2) Huffington Post, (3) Future of Music Coalition



(3)  Two attorneys (one from Missouri) have started a blog that discusses how current laws would apply to superheroes. Their most recent post, for example, addresses Iron Man and Batman and what potential firearms-related laws each would be violating. Pretty interesting stuff.

Blog:Law and the Multiverse                                                                               Article:New York Times
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